Archive for February 2011

Exadata Serial Numbers

Just a quick post (mostly so I can find the info quickly myself when I want it). Here’s how to get the master serial number for an Exadata Rack:

ipmitool sunoem cli ‘show /SP system_identifier’

Apparently by convention the Exadata Rack serial number is appended to the end of ILOM system identifier string. Here’s an example:

[enkdb01:root] /root 
> ipmitool sunoem cli 'show /SP system_identifier'
Connected. Use ^D to exit.
-> show /SP system_identifier

  /SP
    Properties:
        system_identifier = Sun Oracle Database Machine _YOUR_SERIAL_NUMBER_HERE_


-> Session closed
Disconnected

Thanks to Dan Norris for that bit of info.

You can also get the individual serial numbers for each component in an Exadata Rack like this:

/opt/oracle.SupportTools/CheckHWnFWProfile -S

So you would log on to each machine and run this. Here’s the output from one of the DB Servers in our system:
Continue reading ‘Exadata Serial Numbers’ »

Exatadata Book 2

I have been getting quite a few questions about our upcoming Exadata Book lately so I thought I would post a quick update. We are working feverishly on it so please give us a break!

Just kidding!

I am actually feeling like we can see the light at the end of the tunnel now. We are well past the half way mark and I am feeling confident about the content. Well more than confident actually. I think it’s going to be awesome! In large part that’s due to the fact that I feel like we have the Dream Team working on the project. Tanel Poder has signed on as a co-author. Kevin Closson is the Official Technical Reviewer (and we’re tentatively planning on including a number of his comments in the book – in little “Kevin Says” sidebars). As one of the main architects of Exadata, this should provide some interesting perspective. Arup Nanda has volunteered as an unofficial technical reviewer as well. I have to say that Arup has been a great help. And I really appreciate him providing another perspective on what we’re writing about. All three of these guys are fellow Oak Table bretheren, by the way. Randy Johnson is the other co-author, and although he generally prefers to keep a low profile, he is extremely knowledgeable on things that the rest of us don’t deal with that much on a day to day basis, namely backup and recovery and storage configuration. He has a great RAC and ASM background as well. I have to also say that a guy none of you has ever heard of (Andy Colvin) has been a huge help as well. He is our in-house Exadata patching guru. Without him I’m not sure we would have been able to do the necessary testing to complete the book.

I must say that I feel honored to be involved in a project with such an accomplished group of guys. And by the way, we have had numerous offers from people that I have a lot of respect for to help with various aspects of the project. I want to thank all of you for those offers, even if we haven’t taken you up on all of them (our little brains can only absorb so much feedback at any one time). The book is actually available for pre-order on the Amazon already (so someone must think we are actually going to finish it pretty soon). I think we’re  right on track for later spring delivery. 🙂

Most Expensive SQL Statement Ever

You know the cost calculation that the cost based optimizer (CBO) uses to determine which execution plan to choose for a SQL statement, right? If you don’t, you should immediately stop reading this and pick up a good novel instead. Ah, you’re still here? Well I got an interesting email today from one of my co-workers saying he had to kill a query yesterday. Actually that’s a big part of his current job. Killing runaway queries – apparently that job takes most of his time between 8 and 5. Anyway, he sent me this execution plan today, no comments, “just have a look at this”, he said.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation              | Name             | Rows  | Bytes|TempSpc| Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT       |                  |       |       |      |    65P(100)|          |
|   1 |  SORT ORDER BY         |                  |    18E|    15E|   15E|    65P (78)|999:59:59 |
|   2 |   COUNT                |                  |       |       |      |            |          |
|*  3 |    FILTER              |                  |       |       |      |            |          |
|   4 |     NESTED LOOPS       |                  |    18E|    15E|      |    14P  (3)|999:59:59 |
|   5 |      NESTED LOOPS      |                  |   984G|   216T|      |    14G  (3)|999:59:59 |
|   6 |       TABLE ACCESS FULL| CAT_6000_6001TBL |  7270K|  1074M|      |   176K  (3)| 00:15:46 |
|   7 |       TABLE ACCESS FULL| CAT_6000TBL      |   135K|    11M|      |  1950   (3)| 00:00:11 |
|   8 |      INDEX FULL SCAN   | PK_OBJECTS       |    32M|   306M|      | 15207   (3)| 00:01:22 |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

So I had a look. Yes – that’s a 65P in the cost column. I’ve seen worse (but not in a production system). Cost is not always a good indication of run time, by the way. It’s just a sort of normalized estimation after all. But the estimate for the number of rows and bytes (18E and 15E) are very impressive as well. This query ran for several hours before my buddy finally killed it. As you might expect, the query was missing a join condition between a couple of large tables (7M and 32M).

Here’s a test I worked up to see how big a number I could get.

SYS@LAB1024> !cat dplan.sql
set lines 150
select * from table(dbms_xplan.display_cursor('&sql_id','&child_no','typical'))
/

SYS@LAB1024> @dplan
Enter value for sql_id: gf5nnx0pyfqq2
Enter value for child_no: 

PLAN_TABLE_OUTPUT
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SQL_ID  gf5nnx0pyfqq2, child number 0
-------------------------------------
select a.col2, sum(a.col1) from kso.skew a, kso.skew b group by a.col2

Plan hash value: 321450672

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation               | Name    | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT        |         |       |       |   689G(100)|          |
|   1 |  HASH GROUP BY          |         |     1 |    16 |   689G (84)|999:59:59 |
|   2 |   MERGE JOIN CARTESIAN  |         |  1024T|    14P|   145G (22)|999:59:59 |
|   3 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL    | SKEW    |    32M|   488M| 10032  (18)| 00:01:21 |
|   4 |    BUFFER SORT          |         |    32M|       |   689G (84)|999:59:59 |
|   5 |     INDEX FAST FULL SCAN| SKEW_PK |    32M|       |  4558  (22)| 00:00:37 |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------


17 rows selected.

SYS@LAB1024> @dplan
Enter value for sql_id: 12p7fuydx3dd5
Enter value for child_no: 

PLAN_TABLE_OUTPUT
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SQL_ID  12p7fuydx3dd5, child number 0
-------------------------------------
select a.col2, sum(a.col1) from kso.skew a, kso.skew b, kso.skew c group by
a.col2

Plan hash value: 175710540

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                | Name    | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT         |         |       |       |    18E(100)|          |
|   1 |  HASH GROUP BY           |         |     1 |    16 |    18E (81)|999:59:59 |
|   2 |   MERGE JOIN CARTESIAN   |         |    18E|    15E|  4670P (22)|999:59:59 |
|   3 |    MERGE JOIN CARTESIAN  |         |  1024T|    14P|   145G (22)|999:59:59 |
|   4 |     TABLE ACCESS FULL    | SKEW    |    32M|   488M| 10032  (18)| 00:01:21 |
|   5 |     BUFFER SORT          |         |    32M|       |   145G (22)|999:59:59 |
|   6 |      INDEX FAST FULL SCAN| SKEW_PK |    32M|       |  4558  (22)| 00:00:37 |
|   7 |    BUFFER SORT           |         |    32M|       |    18E (81)|999:59:59 |
|   8 |     INDEX FAST FULL SCAN | SKEW_PK |    32M|       |  4558  (22)| 00:00:37 |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


21 rows selected.

SYS@LAB1024> @dplan
Enter value for sql_id: 7b53dxh6w6mpj
Enter value for child_no: 

PLAN_TABLE_OUTPUT
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SQL_ID  7b53dxh6w6mpj, child number 0
-------------------------------------
select a.col2, sum(a.col1) from kso.skew a, kso.skew b, kso.skew c, kso.skew
d group by a.col2

Plan hash value: 3965951819

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                 | Name    | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT          |         |       |       |    18E(100)|          |
|   1 |  HASH GROUP BY            |         |     1 |    16 |    18E  (0)|999:59:59 |
|   2 |   MERGE JOIN CARTESIAN    |         |    18E|    15E|    18E  (0)|999:59:59 |
|   3 |    MERGE JOIN CARTESIAN   |         |    18E|    15E|  4670P (22)|999:59:59 |
|   4 |     MERGE JOIN CARTESIAN  |         |  1024T|    14P|   145G (22)|999:59:59 |
|   5 |      TABLE ACCESS FULL    | SKEW    |    32M|   488M| 10032  (18)| 00:01:21 |
|   6 |      BUFFER SORT          |         |    32M|       |   145G (22)|999:59:59 |
|   7 |       INDEX FAST FULL SCAN| SKEW_PK |    32M|       |  4558  (22)| 00:00:37 |
|   8 |     BUFFER SORT           |         |    32M|       |  4670P (22)|999:59:59 |
|   9 |      INDEX FAST FULL SCAN | SKEW_PK |    32M|       |  4558  (22)| 00:00:37 |
|  10 |    BUFFER SORT            |         |    32M|       |    18E  (0)|999:59:59 |
|  11 |     INDEX FAST FULL SCAN  | SKEW_PK |    32M|       |  4558  (22)| 00:00:37 |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


24 rows selected.


So it looks like the cost tops out at 18E as does the estimated number of rows. Oddly the number of bytes appears to top out at 15E. So the production query had maxed out the rows and bytes estimate although the cost was significantly under the max. Still 65P is the biggest cost I’ve seen in a production system. Anyone seen a bigger one?

P.S. I have two categories for SQL related posts. “Developer Tricks” and “Wall of Shame”. This one gets both tags.